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Archive for May, 2012

According to Deborah Mao in this article published today on businessweek.com, regulators for the city of Hong Kong has proposed new legislation that would permit representative actions for certain consumer class actions.  The legislation is reportedly a response, at least in part, to concerns about the difficulty of shareholders to seek collective redress for alleged acts of securities fraud, although the new law would not initial apply to securities fraud claims. 

The legislation would likely provide for class actions to be financed through a public legal aid program rather than through contingency fees, as is typically the case in the United States.  The proposal is still in the early stages, and specific legislation remains to be “drafted and introduced,” according to an official quoted in the article.

We’ll keep an eye on future developments relating to the proposed legislation.  Stay tuned…

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In a recent post entitled Concepcion a Year Later, Are Consumer Class Actions Dead Yet?, I invited readers to offer their perspectives on trends in the enforceability of class arbitration waivers now that a year after the Concepcion decision.  In response, Jessie Kokrda Kamens at the Bloomberg BNA Class Action Litigation Report send me a copy of her recent article, Post-Concepcion, Plaintiffs Chalk Up Few Victories, Look to Government for Relief.  Kamens offers the perspectives of several leading class action practitioners on how the law on class arbitration waivers has developed in the lower courts since Concepcion, as well as their predictions on how the law will develop into the future.  Among the observations made in the article:

  • Although class arbitration waivers were upheld in 76 cases, plaintiffs were successful in invalidating arbitration clauses in several key cases, mostly on various federal law grounds.
  • Use of “consumer-friendly” provisions, such as the one at issue in Concepcion that provided for monetary incentives for individuals to pursue arbitration, makes it much more likely that an arbitration clause will be upheld.
  • Observers are eagerly awaiting several federal and state regulatory and legislative developments that may impact the enforceability of class arbitration waivers, including the results of a study being conducted by the federal Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (CFPB) pursuant to Dodd-Frank about the impact of arbitration clauses on consumer financial products, several bills being considered by Congress, and a bill being considered in the California legislature that would render void contracts that contain class action waivers.

Thanks to Bloomberg BNA (www.bna.com) for granting permission to post a copy of the article on this site.  For those of you who are not subscribers, I highly recommend the Bloomberg BNA Class Action Litigation Report.  It is one of the most comprehensive and reliable sources of class action cases and trends available.

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In preparing for our webinar on the use of statistics in class actions tomorrow, I discovered that the California Supreme Court has granted review in Duran v. U.S. Bank, a case that could have major implications for the future of statistical sampling as common proof in class actions.  See my April 6, 2012 post titled Trial by Formula, Statistical Sampling, and the Right to Due Process for a summary of the Court of Appeal’s decision, which has lost its precedential effect by virtue of the decision to grant review.  The supreme court’s docket for the case  is available here.   Kimberly Kralowec has posted many of the court documents on her blog, The UCL Practitioner.

The folks at the Litigation Impact Journal have noted that the decision to grant review in Duran was foreshadowed by Justice Werdegar’s concurrence in his own majority opinion in the California Supreme Court’s highly publicized decision last month in Brinker Restaurant Corp. v. Superior Court.  In that concurrence, Justice Werdeger argued that “[r]epresentative testimony, surveys, and statistical analysis all are available as tools to render manageable determinations of the extent of liability [in wage and hour cases].”  In Duran, the court will have an opportunity to explore that issue in more detail.

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It’s not too late to sign up for next Wednesday’s Strafford Publications Webinar, Statistics in Class Action Litigation: Admissibility, Expert Witnesses and Impact of Wal-Mart v. Dukes.  Click the link on the title of the program for more information and to sign up.

For anyone looking for sneak preview, here are the program slides, which were are the result of the joint efforts of my co-presenters, Brian Troyer of Thompson Hine and Rick Preston of Hitachi Consulting, and me.  We hope you can make it!

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After 12 years of litigation, a trial court in Germany has finally reached a decision in a landmark case for group actions in European civil law jurisdictions.  The court decided that Deutsche Telekom did not make false or misleading statements of fact in a prospectus for a secondary stock offering in 2000. 

The case was the first of its kind under 2005 German legislation allowing for special model proceedings in mass actions for certain types of securities fraud, which had been enacted as a direct result of the thousands of individual lawsuits that had been filed against Deutsche Telekom for prospectus fraud after the stock dropped following the secondary offering.  The law that created the group action procedure under which the case was tried is known in English as the Capital Market Model Proceedings Act.  Passed in 2005, the Act allows for the trial court to assign a representative plaintiff in a model proceeding that is to be tried first while similar claims are suspended.  The purpose of the model proceeding is to resolve any generic or common issues for all of the cases, but unlike in a U.S. class action, the model proceeding does not have the legal effect of also resolving all of the individual claims.  As a result, although today’s ruling is a victory for the defendant, it does not represent an end to the litigation even if it is upheld on appeal.

This article from Karin Matussek in BusinessWeek summarizes the decision and its potential implications.  According to the article, the attorney for the model plaintiffs has stated that they do plan to appeal.

The case is a “model” proceeding for more than just the resolution of the claims against Deutsche Telekom.  It has been followed by many academics and policymakers in Europe and elsewhere as a test case for the viability of group proceedings in common law jurisdictions.  Time will tell whether the German experiment in group proceedings will be seen as a success.  Concerns that the introduction of group litigation procedures in Europe will usher in a US-style litigation culture will no doubt be tempered by the fact that the defendant ultimately prevailed.  On the other hand, the length of time that the it took for the model proceeding to be resolved raises legitimate questions about the long-term social utility and efficiency of the procedure.   By comparison, class action litigation brought in the United States alleging prospective liability by U.S. investors against Deutsche Telekom arising out of the same offering was settled for more than $120 million more than seven years ago, in 2005.

The German Capital Market Model Proceedings Act and the Deutsche Telekom case are among the many cutting-edge topics addressed in the book World Class Actions, which is still on schedule to be on bookshelves early this summer.  The German chapter is authored by Dr. Luidger Röckrath, attorney with the law firm Gleiss Lutz.  Stay tuned here for more updates on the status of of the book.

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On May 1, we received the following comment in response to a post from last May entitled Will AT&T v. Concepcion Really Kill the Consumer Class Action?

Melissa 

It has been almost a year. Could someone tell me, in their opinion, what effect Concepcion has had on consumer class actions over the last 11 months?

According to a recent New York Times article by David Segal titled A Rising Tide Against Class Action Suits, the effect has been significant.  The article cites a report from the consummer advocacy group, Public Citizen, which found 76 opinions relying on Concepcion as a reason to prevent class actions from “moving ahead.”

I have no reason to doubt the accuracy of the number of opinions cited in the Public Citizen report, and there is no doubt that Concepcion has had an impact on class action litigation, both in consumer class actions and in other subject matter areas.  However, I would caution that simply looking at the number of class actions that have been unsuccessful due to class arbitration waivers does not tell the whole story.   Here are a few observations to consider in assessing the impact of Concepcion:

  • Concepcion has not been treated by the lower courts as foreclosing all arguments for declaring an arbitration clause invalid.  A case in point is the Second Circuit’s recent decision in In re Amex III., which relied on the federal common law of arbitrability in declaring a class arbitration waiver invalid.
  • Class action litigation has been on the decline in substantive areas that are not impacted by arbitration clauses, such as in securties class actions.
  • There are many areas of consumer class action litigation that remain unaffected by arbitration clauses because they either involve claims where there may be no contractual relationship between the plaintiff and the defendant, including statutory penalty class actions such as TCPA class actions class actions and certain data privacy class actions, or they involve areas of the law where arbitration clauses are prohibited, including many insurance class actions.  A careful review of the data may show that consumer class action litigation has simply shifted to these areas.
  • Recognizing that arbitration clauses do not necessarily provide a magic talisman against class action litigation and that implementing an overly consumer-friendly arbitration clause may actually encourage litigation, not all companies have rushed to adopt arbitration clauses into their consumer contracts.

In summary, I would say that while Concepcion‘s ban on state laws invalidating arbitration clauses has become an important consideration in litigating consumer class actions, it has not brought about their end.

I’d love to hear what readers have to say about their own perspectives on this issue.  Please feel to comment below.

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Robert H. Klonoff, Dean of the Lewis and Clark Law School and author of the quintessential class action compendium, Class Actions and Other Multi-Party Litigation in a Nutshell, has authored an excellent research paper entitled The Decline of Class Actions.  The paper which will be published in Volume 90 of the Washington University Law Review, but a draft is now available for free download at SSRN.  Dean Klonoff asserts that recent trends in class action decisions, which make it more difficult for plaintiffs to obtain class certification, have undermined the “compensation, deterrence, and efficiency” objectives underlying Rule 23.  He urges policymakers, rulemakers, and the courts to take a “more balanced approach to classwide adjudication.”

Whether or not you agree with Dean Klonoff’s criticisms from an academic point of view, the article is a must read for anyone looking for a good synopsis of the key developments in the U.S. class action law over the past several years.  From the Class Action Fairness Act to the Supreme Court’s recent decisions in Dukes and Concepcion to slightly less glamorous topics such as the necessity of a precise class definition, Klonoff’s article is impressive in its comprehensive analysis of relevant recent developments.

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