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Archive for the ‘class action reform’ Category

Along with my colleague, Jacqueline Matthews, I recently authored a commentary on the possible changes to the rule on issue classes, Rule 23(c)(4), Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, that were proposed recently in a report issued by the Rule 23 Subcommittee.  Our commentary was among several articles on the Subcommittee’s proposals published by the ABA Section of Litigation’s Class Actions and Derivative Suits Committee (CADS), all of which I strongly recommend.  Please visit the link below to see our article, and if you aren’t already a CADS member, you should strongly consider becoming one.

 

 

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Last week, the Rule 23 Subcommittee to the Advisory Committee on Rules of Civil Procedure issued its latest report outlining potential revisions to Rule 23, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.  Click the following link to view the Rule 23 Subcommittee Report.  Generally, the topics addressed in the Subcommittee’s Report are as follows:

  1. Settlement Approval Criteria
  2. Settlement Class Certification
  3. Cy Pres Treatment
  4. Dealing with Objectors
  5. Rule 68 Offers and Mootness
  6. Issue Classes
  7. Notice

If you’d like an opportunity to give feedback to Subommittee in person, make sure to sign up for the upcoming Second Annual Western Regional CLE Program on Class Actions and Mass Torts, scheduled for June 19 in San Francisco, where several Subcommittee members will be on hand to discuss the report and receive comments in a town hall-style discussion.

Also, I will be among several contributors to an upcoming commentary on the report to be published by the ABA’s CADS Committee.  My submission will address the Subcommittee’s suggestions on Issue Classes.   Stay tuned for more information about that publication.

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In keeping with the time-honored tradition of end-of-the-year top 10 lists, I’ve assembled my annual list of the top 10 most significant class action developments below.  Whether these are actually the top 10 most significant decisions over the past year may be subject to reasonable debate, so please feel free to add your own favorites in the comments section.

1. Certiorari denied in “moldy washer” cases – In my view, the single biggest development impacting class action practice over the past year was the Court’s decision not to take on the question of “issue certification” presented in the Sears and Whirlpool “moldy washer” cases.  This non-decision opens the door for significant litigation over whether isolated issues should be certified for class treatment even where significant individual litigation would be necessary following resolution of the class wide issues.

2. Judge Posner’s class action settlement decisions – Judge Posner wins the award for the jurist having the single biggest impact on class action practice in 2014.  In addition to the Supreme Court declining to take on review of his decision in one of the “moldy washer” cases, Butler v. Sears, Roebuck & Co., Judge Posner authored two significant (and harshly worded) decisions discussing the standards for evaluating the fairness of class action settlements, including Eubank v. Pella Corp., Nos. 13-2091, -2133, 2136, -2162, 2202 (7th Cir., June 2, 2014), and Redman v. RadioShack Corp., case number 14‐1470, 14‐1471 and 14‐1658 (7th Cir., Sept. 19, 2014).  These decisions are emblematic of a more general trend in the courts of subjecting class action settlements, especially coupon settlements, to ever-greater scrutiny.

3. Basic framework remains largely unchanged after Halliburton II – One of only three Supreme Court decisions of significance on class action issues this past year, the Court largely maintained the status quo in declining to overrule the framework for evaluating “fraud on the market” theory of reliance in securities class actions.

4. Whirlpool trial ends with victory for the defendant – Not long after the Supreme Court declined review, the first of the “issue” class cases went to trial against Whirlpool.  The trial ended in a defense verdict, although as I wrote in October, I’m not sure that’s necessarily a good thing for defendants in the long-term.

5. Court clarifies removal pleading standards in Dart Cherokee Basin Operating Co. v. Owens – In one of the Roberts Court’s most helpful class-action-related decisions, at least from a practical standpoint, the majority removed barriers to corporate defendants’ ability to remove cases under the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA), clarifying that jurisdictional facts need only be pled, not supported by evidence, in the notice of removal.

6. California Supreme Court issues significant decision on the use of statistical evidence to support class certification – An individual state court decision has to be pretty significant to make my annual top 10 list, but I think Duran v. U.S. Bank National Association fits the bill.  The decision is one of the most comprehensive to date in addressing the potential pitfalls of reliance on statistics as a proxy for common, class wide proof.

7. Supreme Court holds in AU Optronics that consumer actions brought by state attorneys general are not “mass actions” subject to the Class Action Fairness Act – It’s probably a misnomer to call AU Optronics a “class action” case, since the issue presented was whether actions brought by state AGs on behalf of consumers were “mass actions.”  But because the case involved interpretation of CAFA, it makes this year’s list.

8. International class and collective action litigation continues to expand – Class, collective, and multi-party actions continue to expand outside of the United States and Canada.  Examples included France joining the list of Civil Law jurisdictions in Europe to enact a “class action” law, and a group action in Austria, joined by more than 25,000 litigants, challenging Facebook privacy policies.

9. Data breach class actions proliferate – High profile data breaches and hacking incidents made news, and resulted in class actions, in 2014.  From a rash of payment card breaches impacting customers of large retailers like Target and Home Depot to the more recent Sony hacking incident, data breach class action litigation shows no signs of slowing down any time soon.

10. Supreme Court grants, then dismisses, certiorari in Public Employees’ Retirement System of Mississippi, v. IndyMac MBS, avoiding a high court ruling on the question of whether statute of repose can be tolled for absent class members under the American Pipe tolling doctrine.  In what has become a trend of the past year, this is yet another missed opportunity for the Supreme Court to address a class action issues of significance.

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After years of debate, France has finally passed its first “class action” law. Act No. 2014-344 of 17 March 2014 (relatif à la Consommation) went into effect on March 18. Chapter One of the new law introduces a new collective action procedure to adjudicate claims arising out of anti-competitive behavior and certain other consumer protection claims. Like the group action laws of many other civil law countries in Europe, the new procedure is very different from consumer class actions as they are known in the United States and other common law countries. The law creates a simplified opt-in collective action procedure that can only be enforced by an approved consumer association, not by individual litigants.  However, it is a significant development for a jurisdiction that has long resisted implementing collective action procedures of any kind.

Here is a link to the google translation of the Act in English.

Thanks to friend of ClassActionBlawg Larissa Clare Pochmann da Silva for tipping us off to this new development.

For a more detailed summary of the various aspects of the new law, see this Lexology article authored by Jérôme Philippe, Maria Trabucchi, Stephane Benouville, Dimitri Lecat and Alexandra Szekely of Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP.

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Earlier today, the Supreme Court denied certiorari in two highly anticipated appeals of decisions by the Sixth and Seventh Circuit Courts of Appeals to grant class certification over breach of warranty claims involving allegedly defective washing machines.  The denial of cert in Butler v. Sears, Roebuck & Co., Nos. 11-8029, 12-8030 (7th Cir., Aug. 22, 2013) (Posner, J.) and In re Front‐Loading Washer Products Liability Litigation, No. 10-4188 (6th Cir. July 18, 2013) was a surprise to many commentators who had seen the moldy washer cases as providing the perfect opportunity for the Court to continue its trend clarifying the boundaries of class certification in cases like Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes,  Amgen Inc. v. Connecticut Retirement Plans and Trust Funds, and Comcast Corp. v. Behrend.  The denial of cert means that the Court will not be addressing the question of whether it is appropriate for a federal court to order class certification of discrete, common issues in a case without analyzing whether those issues predominate more generally over the individualized questions, like injury or damages.  That question will be left to the lower courts for the time being.

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On Monday, I summarized proposed Arizona class action reform legislation forwarded to me by Shawn Aiken of Aiken Schenk Hawkins & Ricciardi P.C.  Yesterday, Aiken forwarded the final version of the class action bill as introduced before the Arizona Senate.

Click here for a copy of SB 1452.

Aiken also noted that there could be challenges to the legislative power to enact a new class action rule:

Our state constitution has many unique provisions. The one that will be invoked here is this: “The supreme court shall have . . . [the] [p]ower to make rules relative to all procedural matters in any court.”  Arizona Constitution, Article 6, Section 5.  The question will be what is more procedural than judicial certification of class actions?

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Phoenix Attorney Shawn Aiken sent me an advance copy of a draft class action bill set to be introduced in the Arizona legislature this week.  The bill sets forth some specific requirements for class certification that are much more exacting than those required under federal Rule 23 and most state class action rules.  Some of the highlights are summarized below.  Click this link for a complete copy of the bill.

  • clear and convincing evidence would be required to justify a grant of class certification
  • orders granting class certification would have to be supported by a detailed written statement of the reasons and evidence justifying the decision
  • in assessing superiority, the court would be required to consider, among other things, “whether it is probable that the amount which may be recovered by individual class members will be large enough in relation to the expense and effort of administering the action to justify maintaining the case as a class action”
  • there would be a rebuttable presumption against class certification in cases involving claims where individual knowledge, causation, and  reliance are required elements
  • certification of a case as a class action would not relieve any class member of the requirement of proving individual injury or damages
  • class notice must include a statement of “the possible financial consequences for the class”
  • the law would expressly provide that the plaintiff would bear the initial cost of distributing notice to the class
  • appeals from orders granting or denying class certification could be taken as a matter of right the same as a final judgment, and trial court proceedings would be automatically stayed pending the appeal

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