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Archive for July 6th, 2009

The guys at the Drug and Device Law Blog have a post outlining “six things we’ve heard” about why no lawyers from the ten most profitable law firms have blogs.  Perhaps wisely, the’ve chosen to stay out of the fray by commenting further.  I do not share their good sense.  I’m completely unqualified to speak to what motivates lawyers at the 10 most profitable firms to do or not do anything, but I will say some things in defense of the benefits of blogging for big firm lawyers.

1. Lawyers at the most profitable firms are stupid:

“‘Profitable’ large law firms don’t see the need or the benefit of doing blogs. Clearly, if they are already doing well, why go to the trouble and work involved in blogging, when too many BigLaw lawyers still believe that the work will always be there. A mistake of course, but a perception nonetheless.”

I can offer no proof that this is a mistaken perception, but it does presuppose that the only reason to do anything is to make more money. 

2. Lawyers at the most profitable firms are too busy:

“The reason they are so profitable is that everyone is working their heads off – nobody has time to blog.”

I started work at 8:21 a.m. today and finished at 11:06 p.m., with 30 minutes off to drive home and pick up a Chipotle burrito on the way, so don’t talk to me about being too busy to blog.

3. Lawyers at those firms won’t stoop to blog:

“They are so profitable that they don’t think they need to stoop to marketing (which is what they think blogging is).”

Could be.  Blogging is the geekiest form of shameless self-promotion, unless you count Twitter.  But it’s also a great outlet for self-expression and a place to share ideas with smart lawyers who share your interests.

4. Lawyers at those firms don’t want to give away their product for free:

“Lawyers at the top ten PPP firms wouldn’t want anyone at the firm to blog because they might divulge the firm’s precious secrets.”

Of course, how to bill 1000 hours for a 150-page brief and the complete history of the juridical link doctrine are secrets worth protecting, but think about how much more money you could make if you made a nickel for every person who clicked on your blog to learn about your firm’s precious secrets.

5. Lawyers at those firms lack the necessary skill set:

“Those high-profit firms are so profitable because they are very good at making money, but the skill sets required for being good at making money may not be the same as the skill sets required to blog.”

ClassActionBlawg.com is proof positive that blogging does not require a skill set.

6. Lawyers at those firms correctly believe that blogging is unlikely to yield a decent return on investment because of the nature of the firms, the work they do, and their clients:

“When your firm name is already well known and your reputation that well established, you wouldn’t add any value by blogging.”

This one is right on.  That’s why you end up with so many law blogs written by nobodies who’ve never accomplished anything and who hope that by starting a blog, you’ll mistake them for someone famous.  Like this one from some guy named Spence who doesn’t even own a proper suit for court: http://gerryspence.wordpress.com/.  Or how about these two: http://www.becker-posner-blog.com/?  They sound more like Becker-POSER to me.

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