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Archive for December 15th, 2010

According to this December 9, 2010 Bloomberg article from Adriana Lopez Caraveo and Jens Erik Gould, the Mexican Senate has passed a bill that would introduce a form of class action litigation to Mexico.  According to the article:

The bill, which now moves to the lower house, would allow Mexicans to bring class action suits against companies that provide consumer goods and services, financial services or that cause environmental damage, according to the bill. Mexican law doesn’t currently allow for such lawsuits.

For more on the bill, see this December 10 article in The News from Víctor Mayén, which characterizes the bill as authorizing collective actions

regarding the consumption of private or public goods and services, environmental services and financial services that harm the consumer, due to monopolistic or other undue practices.

Neither article assesses the odds of the bill’s passage in the lower house, although the unanimous passage in the Senate would appear to suggest that the chances are good.

The legislation follows an amendment to article 17 of the Mexican constitution, passed in June, granting authority to the legislature to pass legislation regulating class or collective actions.  For more on the amendment, see this entry posted in June at the Stanford University global class actions clearinghouse.

Despite a (somewhat) diligent Internet search, I have not been able to locate an English translation of the Bill, so unfortunately I can’t report on any of the details of the legislation.  This August 2008 report from emii.com hinted that the legislation being considered in Mexico at the time was following a more “Latin American” pattern, as distinguished from US-style class action procedure.

If any readers have more information about this bill, we welcome your comments.

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