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Archive for January 11th, 2011

Two colleagues separately sent me a copy of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision yesterday in Greenberger v. GEICO General Insurance Co., slip op., No. 09-1603 (7th Cir., Jan. 10, 2011) (Sykes, J.), so I thought it was worthy of a summary. 

Greenberger involved would-be class action claims against an insurer for the alleged practice of not paying to have vehicles restored to their pre-loss condition, as required under its policies.  The district court had granted the defendant’s motion for summary judgment before reaching a decision on class certification.  The Seventh Circuit affirmed.  The panel’s decision ostensibly rests on the holdings of earlier cases and doesn’t pretend to make new law.  However, the number of different issues addressed may make the case a common citation in future class certification response briefs, especially in insurance class actions in Illinois and the Seventh Circuit, but potentially elsewhere as well.  The holdings included:

  • Jurisdiction under the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005 (“CAFA”) attaches to a class action complaint even if a class is never certified.  Slip op. at 5-6 (relying on Cunningham Charter Corp. v. Learjet, Inc., 592 F.3d 805, 806 (7th Cir. 2010)).
  • An insured cannot succeed on a breach of contract claim against his insurer for allegedly failing to bring a vehicle to a pre-loss condition if the vehicle is not available to be examined, because the insured cannot prove either a breach of the contract (by showing that the vehicle was not repaired to its pre-loss condition) or damages (by establishing the difference in value between the vehicle as repaired and the vehicle in its pre-loss condition).  Slip op. at 6-11 (relying on Avery v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co., 835 N.E.2d 801 (Ill. 2005)).
  • A plaintiff cannot prevail on a consumer fraud or common law fraud claim if the fraud claim is based on the same predicate facts as a claim for breach of contract.  Slip op. at 11-16 (also relying on Avery).
  • In Illinois, no fiduciary duty exists between insurer and insured as a matter of law, unless the plaintiff can prove by clear and convincing evidence that special circumstances existed such that the insured placed trust or confidence in the insurer.  Slip op. at 16-17 (citing Fichtel v. Bd. of Dirs. of River Shore of Naperville Condo. Ass’n, 907 N.E.2d 903 (Ill. App. Ct. 2009); Martin v. State Farm Mut. Ins. Co., 808 N.E.2d 47 (Ill. App. Ct. 2004)).

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