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Archive for February 24th, 2011

I will be speaking in an upcoming live phone/web seminar on CAFA removal issues sponsored by Strafford Publications.  Here is some information about the program:

CAFA Removal and Remand: Latest Developments

Tuesday, March 29, 1:00pm-2:30pm EDT

Program Description:

Jurisdictional ambiguities in the CAFA statute continue to challenge litigators. One example is the Eleventh Circuit’s Cappuccitti v. DirecTV ruling that the district court lacked jurisdiction because no individual plaintiff or putative class member met the amount-in-controversy requirement. While the Eleventh Circuit later vacated its decision, its initial confusion was caused by CAFA’s ambiguous jurisdictional structure. Another evolving jurisdictional issue is the federal court’s authority to retain jurisdiction post-removal. Courts still wrestle with the effect of post-removal events such as denial of class certification or loss of diversity on continued federal court jurisdiction. While several recent cases more firmly establish continued post-removal federal court jurisdiction, this issue is far from settled.

This program will provide class action litigators with an examination of the latest case law developments in CAFA removal and remand, analyze continued jurisdictional ambiguities and pitfalls, and offer litigation strategies for navigating these ambiguities. The panel will offer perspectives and guidance on these and other critical questions: How are the courts resolving ambiguities in CAFA’s amount-in-controversy requirements for federal court jurisdiction? Do the federal courts retain jurisdiction even after class certification is denied or diversity is destroyed? What post-removal events or circumstances can result in a remand to state court?

The panel presentation will be followed by a  live question and answer session.

For more information and to register, see the Strafford Publications website.

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The Baker Hostetler website has a new Executive Alert discussing the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision in Kartman v. State Farm Mut. Automobile Ins. Co., Case no. 09-1725, 2011 U.S. App. LEXIS 2830, and its potential implications.  Kartman addressed, among other things, the applicability of Rule 23(b)(2) to consumer class actions in which the ultimate goal is to recover money for class members.  According to the Executive Alert:

This decision is significant in its rejection of the creative attempt to certify a class of consumer claims for injunctive relief, the analysis of the “finality” and “appropriateness” elements of Rule 23(b)(2) for which little authority exists, and the willingness to delve into the merits of the underlying claims to determine that class certification was not appropriate.

Congratulations to my partner, Mark Johnson, and the rest of his team in Columbus on their victory in the case on behalf of State Farm.

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