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Archive for the ‘Lawyers’ Resources’ Category

If you’re prosecuting or defending a class action or are interested in class action developments (and I’m not sure why on Earth you would be reading this otherwise) you’ll want to know about a great new ABA publication on the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005 (CAFA).  The Class Action Fairness Act, Law and Strategy, is a book of collected works written by experts on both sides of the bar and deftly edited by former ABA CADS Committee Chair Gregory C. Cook.  Those familiar with CADS (the Class Actions and Derivative Suits Committee of the ABA Section of Litigation) will recognize the names of many of the knowledgeable contributors.

The book covers nearly every CAFA-related topic conceivable, from the history of CAFA to the provisions expanding federal diversity jurisdiction in class actions and the provisions regulating federal class action settlements.  It can be used as a reference guide for the basic requirements of CAFA, but it also provides practical strategy tips for both plaintiffs and defendants in dealing with common and not-so-common CAFA issues.  Here is a summary of the Table of Contents:

  • Chapter 1 – Introduction and Overview
  • Chapter 2 – CAFA in Congress: The Eight-Year Struggle
  • Chapter 3 – Hey CAFA, Is that a Class Action?
  • Chapter 4 – The Amount in Controversy under CAFA: Have You Got What It Takes for Federal Court?
  • Chapter 5 – CAFA’s Numerosity Requirement, or How to Count from 1 to 100
  • Chapter 6 – Basics of MInimal Diversity in CAFA
  • Chapter 7 – Welcome to the Jungle: CAFA Exceptions
  • Chapter 8 – How CAFA Expands Federal Jurisdiction to Include Certain Mass Actions
  • Chapter 9 – Advanced Procedural and Strategic Considerations on Removal under CAFA
  • Chapter 10 – CAFA-Related Appeals
  • Chapter 11 – CAFA Settlement Provisions

Be sure to click the link on the title of the book, above, for information about how to get your copy.  If you don’t have it, chances are that your opponent will!

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The Baker Hostetler Privacy and Data Protection Team has published a comprehensive guide to the data privacy laws in countries around the world.  The International Compendium of Data Privacy Laws summarizes the civil, criminal, and regulatory data breach and other privacy laws of more than 40 countries.

 

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For those readers who may be dissatisfied with my somewhat uneven coverage of all things class action lately, here’s a reminder about a great source for the latest in class action news and trends: the ABA’s Class Actions and Derivative Suits (CADS) Committee Group Page on LinkedIn.  CADS membership is free to all ABA Section of Litigation members.  Participation in the LinkedIn group is a benefit to all CADS members.  For more information on how to join CADS, click here.  For the LinkedIn Group, click here

Some highlights of the content available on the LinkedIn page:

  • A summary of the recent oral argument before the United States Supreme Court in Standard Fire Insurance Co. v. Knowles
  • Coverage of a recent 7th Circuit decision discussing whether misconduct by putative class counsel requires denial of class certification.
  • Links to articles authored by members in other publications or blogs.
  • Announcements about upcoming CADS events.

And much more…

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For those of you interested in the forthcoming book, World Class Actions, here’s a quick update.  The page proofs should be ready by the end of next week, and barring unexpected delay, we are still on pace for an early summer publication date.  For those that haven’t yet heard about the book, it is a guide to class and collective action litigation around the world.  Here’s a link to the Oxford University Press web page for the book where you will find a more detailed synopsis.  I’ll continue to post updates as the publication date approaches.

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The Baker Hostetler Employment Class Action Blog is constantly putting out quality content, but they have two new recent posts that I would especially recommend to my readers.  They include:

  • This February 6 post from John Lewis discussing the impacts, both on employment cases and otherwise, of the Second Circuit’s recent Amex III decision.
  • This February 6 Post from Greg Mersol discussing a recent federal court decision holding that the pleading standards articulated in Iqbal and Twombly do not apply to affirmative defenses in class actions.
  • This January 20 post from John Lewis discussing the U.S. Supreme Court’s most recent pro-arbitration opinion in CompuCredit Corp v. Greenwood.

Even if you aren’t an employment lawyer, I would strongly suggest adding www.employmentclassactionreport.com to your list of favorites!

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Ok, just a bit further…

Mark Herrmann, former contributor to the wildly successful Drug and Device Law Blog, sent me a note the other day that his book co-authored with Jones Day Partner David B. Alden entitled Drug and Device Product Liability Litigation Strategy (Oxford Univ. Press 2011) is now available.  Here is a link to the book’s page on OUP’s website, where you can get more information and order a copy.

The following is a slightly edited version of the summary that he sent me:

The book is generally a reference work, so big chunks of the book simply bring a beginner up to speed on the defense of drug and device product liability cases. But we say a few things in the book that are new and different. Some of the interesting stuff includes:

1. At pages 181 to 186, we analyze every motion to centralize drug or device cases filed with the MDL Panel from the Panel’s creation through the end of 2010. We count the number of motions granted and denied, and we break down the percentages by time period, showing that the Panel has become slightly more likely to centralize cases as time has passed.

2. At pages 219 to 222, we analyze the use of “direct filing provisions,” which allow plaintiffs to file their complaints directly in the MDL transferee court, rather than being required to file in their home courts and then asking the MDL Panel to transfer the cases. If litigants are not careful, direct filings provisions can alter the applicable choice-of-law analysis, change the identity of the court that tries the case, or alter the trial court’s personal jurisdiction over third-party defendants.

3. Finally, our discussion of the scope of preemption for prescription drugs after the Supreme Court’s decision in Wyeth v. Levine may be noteworthy. At pages 339 to 343, we identify five situations in which claims against prescription drug manufacturers may be preempted even after the Supreme Court’s restriction of preemption in Levine.

We’d love to start a conversation on these issues. And, if we’ve taken the time to write the book, we’d sure like interested folks to know that the book exists.

I have not had a chance to read it yet, but given Herrmann’s body of work on Drug and Device Law Blog, it is guaranteed to be of the highest quality.  It sounds like the quintessential guide to the very specialized area of mass tort and class action litigation, authored by two of the world’s foremost experts on the subject.

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While doing research for another article today, I came across a terrific resource that could come in handy to any lawyer who handles consumer class actions.   It is a 2005 article from Alan S. Brown and Larry E. Hepler entitled Comparison of Consumer Fraud Statutes Across the Fifty States, 55 Fed’n Def. & Corp. Couns. Q. 263 (2005).  A copy is available for download for free at the FDCC website.  In an appendix at pages 290-308, the authors included a chart comparing key aspects of each state’s consumer protection statute. 

Although the article is now several years outdated (so it would be prudent to shepardize), it at least provides a good starting point for any attorney researching state consumer protection or “little FTC” laws.  I only wish I had come across this little gem sooner.

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