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Archive for the ‘Practice Tips’ Category

I recently authored a practice tip for the ABA Consumer Litigation Committee website entitled Consumer Class Action Defense: A Checklist for the First 10 Days, highlighting some key things that class action defense counsel should do or consider within the first 10 days after a class action is filed.  Audra Petrolle of The Rose Law Group in Phoenix authored a complementary practice tip for plaintiffs’ attorneys.  Click the links below to see both practice tips.

http://www.americanbar.org/publications/litigation-committees/consumer/practice/2016/consumer-class-action-defense-a-checklist-for-the-first-10-days.html

http://www.americanbar.org/publications/litigation-committees/consumer/practice/2016/consumer-class-action-prosecution-a-checklist-for-the-first-10-days.html

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Anyone still checking this site will have noticed a complete lack of new content lately, which is mostly the result of pure laziness on my part but partially due to the demands of several other writing projects I’ve been working on.  I’m pleased to announce that one of these articles it out, and the folks at Practical Law the Journal have graciously given permission for me to post a reprint here.  Click the following link to view the article, entitled Key Issues in Data Breach Litigation, which is featured in the October 2014 issue.  Please be sure to visit the Practical Law website to learn how to subscribe to more great content on timely legal topics.

Also, speaking of data privacy litigation, I’ll be part of a panel presenting on the topic at the ABA Institute on Class Actions next week in Chicago.  It’s not too late to register.

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Earlier today, the Supreme Court granted cert in Dart Cherokee Basin Operating Company, LLC v. Owens, No. 13-719, in which it will take up the contours of the standard for providing factual support in a notice of removal under the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005 (CAFA).  Specifically, the issue presented is as follows:

Whether a defendant seeking removal to federal court is required to include evidence supporting federal jurisdiction in the notice of removal, or is alleging the required “short and plain statement of the grounds for removal” enough?

This is the third CAFA removal case that the Court has accepted in as many years.  During the October 2012 term, the Court decided Standard Fire Ins. Co. v Knowles, 133 S. Ct. 1345 (2013), in which it held that a class representative may not avoid CAFA jurisdiction by stipulating to a recovery of damages of less than $5,000,000 on behalf of members of the proposed class.  Earlier in the current term, the Court decided Mississippi ex rel. Jim Hood v. AU Optronics Corp., Case No. 12-1036 (U.S. Jan. 14, 2014), holding that a parens patriae action brought by a state attorney general on behalf of Mississippi residents was not a “mass action” subject to CAFA.

 

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The U.S. Supreme Court issued its first class-action-related decision of the 2013-14 term today, or more precisely, its first non-mass-action-related decision of the term.  In Mississippi ex rel. Jim Hood v. AU Optronics Corp., Case No. 12-1036 (U.S. Jan. 14, 2014), the Court held that a parens patriae action brought by the Mississippi attorney general on behalf of Missouri citizens was not a “mass action” subject to the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005.  My partner Casie Collignon has a more detailed write-up on the decision at the BakerHostetler blog Class Action Lawsuit Defense.

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If you’re prosecuting or defending a class action or are interested in class action developments (and I’m not sure why on Earth you would be reading this otherwise) you’ll want to know about a great new ABA publication on the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005 (CAFA).  The Class Action Fairness Act, Law and Strategy, is a book of collected works written by experts on both sides of the bar and deftly edited by former ABA CADS Committee Chair Gregory C. Cook.  Those familiar with CADS (the Class Actions and Derivative Suits Committee of the ABA Section of Litigation) will recognize the names of many of the knowledgeable contributors.

The book covers nearly every CAFA-related topic conceivable, from the history of CAFA to the provisions expanding federal diversity jurisdiction in class actions and the provisions regulating federal class action settlements.  It can be used as a reference guide for the basic requirements of CAFA, but it also provides practical strategy tips for both plaintiffs and defendants in dealing with common and not-so-common CAFA issues.  Here is a summary of the Table of Contents:

  • Chapter 1 – Introduction and Overview
  • Chapter 2 – CAFA in Congress: The Eight-Year Struggle
  • Chapter 3 – Hey CAFA, Is that a Class Action?
  • Chapter 4 – The Amount in Controversy under CAFA: Have You Got What It Takes for Federal Court?
  • Chapter 5 – CAFA’s Numerosity Requirement, or How to Count from 1 to 100
  • Chapter 6 – Basics of MInimal Diversity in CAFA
  • Chapter 7 – Welcome to the Jungle: CAFA Exceptions
  • Chapter 8 – How CAFA Expands Federal Jurisdiction to Include Certain Mass Actions
  • Chapter 9 – Advanced Procedural and Strategic Considerations on Removal under CAFA
  • Chapter 10 – CAFA-Related Appeals
  • Chapter 11 – CAFA Settlement Provisions

Be sure to click the link on the title of the book, above, for information about how to get your copy.  If you don’t have it, chances are that your opponent will!

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Yesterday, the ALPS 411 Blog published my guest post titled I got this email about a class action.  What should I do?  Among other things, the post addresses how one goes about deciding whether an emailed class action notice is real or spam (or worse). 

For readers not familiar with the company, ALPS is an attorney liability insurer and financial services provider headquartered in my home state of Montana.  Be sure to check out the ALPS 411 Blog for excellent content relating to a host of topics of interest to attorneys, including ethics, malpractice, risk management, and general practice tips.

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This is the last of six posts summarizing my notes of the six presentations at the ABA’s 16th Annual Class Actions Institute held in October in Chicago.  For more on this excellent conference, see my October 31, November 5, November 6November 18, and December 3 CAB posts.

This year’s Institute was capped off by a presentation and demonstration entitled: “Preparing Early and Often,” State-of-the-Art Strategies for Managing Class Action Experts.  Andrew J. McGuiness moderated the panel, which consisted of expert economists Dr. Janet S. Netz and Dr. James Langenfeld, attorneys Mary Jane Fait and Laurie A. Novion, and U.S. District Court Judge Gerald E. Rosen.  The panel’s insightful tips were highlighted by vignettes in the form of mock examinations of the two experts. 

Daubert analysis of proposed expert testimony is required at the class certification, a question on which the Supreme Court may shed some light when it rules on Comcast v. Behrend later this term.  At the moment, circuits that require a Daubert analysis include the Fourth, Seventh, Ninth, and Eleventh Circuits.  The Sixth and Eighth Circuits have both adopted a Daubert-lite standard, while the Fifth Circuit has taken a “Daubert Maybe ” or “Daubert I don’t know” approach to the question.

The vignettes illustrated some of the key potential lines of attack on a plaintiff’s or a defendant’s expert’s opinions presented in support of or in opposition to class certification.  They include (but are not limited to): 1) whether the expert relied on a reliable dataset; 2) whether there is a formulaic basis for calculating damages; 3) whether there are any inconsistencies between the defendant’s own transactional data and outside data, such as market research data; 4) whether any individual variation in the data can be explained in a systemic way; and 5) whether a regression analysis or other analytical model is a valid way of evaluating the data or its causal connection to the defendant’s alleged misconduct.

Both the vignettes and the panelists’ observations served to reinforce how important it is for the lawyer to present an expert’s testimony in a way so that the judge understands the evidence.

One key practice tip offered by the panel was to consider using a consulting expert before turning to a testifying expert.  This way, different models or modes of analysis can be tested without fear of tainting the conclusions of the testifying expert or unnecessarily exposing the testifying expert to impeachment or cross-examination. 

However, that does not mean that it is not necessary to make full disclosure to the testifying expert about the material facts and legal issues in the case.  A common frustration that experts have with lawyers is they oftentimes fail to provide a fair and clear picture of the facts or applicable law, leading the expert to an opinion that is at odds with the facts or irrelevant to the issues in the case.  At minimum, this can put the expert in an awkward position and undermine the attorney’s client’s chances for success.  At worst, it can both lead to an adverse decision and cause undeserved and lasting damage to the expert’s professional reputation.

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