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Archive for the ‘Human Rights Class Actions’ Category

I’m out of town this week, but I would be remiss if didn’t at least alert readers to the Supreme Court’s decision in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, holding that the presumption against extraterritorial jurisdiction of the US Courts applies to human rights cases files under the Alien Tort Statute. This decision continues a trend in the Court over the past few years of limiting jurisdiction over extraterritorial disputes. I have argued that a continuation of this trend will hasten the expansion of class actions and other collective dispute resolutions in jurisdictions outside the United States. Now we shall see…

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While we here in the U.S. continue to litigate class actions over snake oil products and 75 cent charges on our cell phone bills, Canadian class action lawyers have been finding ingenious ways to use class actions to effectuate real social change.  The latest example, according to FP Legal Post,  is a class action filed in B.C. against the University of Victoria on behalf of people who got parking fines after getting booted or towed on university grounds.  The complaint alleges that the University had no legal authority to impose the fines.  This latest suit comes on the heels of a class action filed on behalf of Manitoba drivers who got speeding tickets near construction zones.

 

http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/legalpost/archive/2009/05/28/parking-tickets-challenged-in-class-action.aspx

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If you’re looking for a refreshing story about a class action settlement that isn’t all about money, the LA Times has a story for you.  This article by Teresa Watanabe recounts the history of a series of class actions brought against the U.S. government to obtain amnesty for a classes of immigrants who came to the U.S. legally but later lost their legal immigrant status during the 1980s.  For one Turkish immigrant who stands to regain his legal status as a result of the latest settlement, the news was reason for elation over the possibility of fulfilling a dream of serving his adopted country.

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