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Posts Tagged ‘class arbitration’

Today’s edition of the Baker Hostetler Employment Class Actions Newsletter has two great articles worth noting.

My colleague here in Denver, Holli Hartman, authored an article summarizing developments in challenges to class arbitration waivers following the Court’s decision in AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion.

Cleveland Partner Greg Mersol and Summer Associate George Skupski contributed an entry examining the application of Daubert standards to expert testimony at the class certification stage in light of the Supreme Court’s decision in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes.

Although I’m admittedly somewhat biased, I highly recommend both articles, as well as other employment class action-related news and commentary on the firm’s Employment Class Action Blog.

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My recent SCOTUSblog post  on the October 2010 Supreme Court Term class action decisions does not address an important decision from the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, which was issued last week.  In Litman v. Cellco Partnership, the Third Circuit held that New Jersey decision holding class arbitration waivers unconscionable was preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act.  To that extent, the court’s analysis is a relatively straightforward application of the federal preemption analysis in Concepcion.  But what is important about the Litman decision is that the court’s analysis makes no mention of whether the arbitration clause at issue contained the sorts of consumer-friendly procedural protections contained in the AT&T Mobility arbitration clause at issue in Concepcion.  Based on the quoted portions of the agreement discussed in Litman, it appears that it did not.  As a result even in cases outside the Third Circuit, Litman provides a defendant with strong authority for arguing that class arbitration waivers cannot be held unconscionable under state law principles regardless of the presence of any special consumer protections ensuring that arbitration provides a meaningful mechanism for redress.

However, potential defendants should still be cautious about going too far with arbitration provisions that mandate a waiver of all avenues for class relief if they don’t also contain some provision for incentivizing the pursuit of individual arbitration of a meritorious claim.  There are a variety of other arguments, including arguments based on the federal common law of arbitrability, that may still be persuasive to many courts when the particular arbitration agreement at issue appears to foreclose any possibility of litigation at all.  Moreover, the decision of only one of the federal circuits will not likely be enough to prevent attempts by plaintiffs’ lawyers to attack broadly-worded arbitration agreements in consumer contracts in the short-term.  So, although Litman is a good decision for defendants, prudent corporations will not treat it as an invitation to adopt draconian class arbitration waivers that have the effect of precluding nearly all consumer litigation.

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Daniel Fisher, who writes the Full Disclosure blog at Forbes.com, posted an article last Friday titled Has Scalia Killed the Class Action?  Fisher’s article one of the best I’ve seen in discussing the potential practical impact that the Supreme Court’s recent class arbitration waiver decision in AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion may have on future consumer class action litigation.  I highly recommend it. 

Although much remains to be seen about Concepcion‘s long-term impact, from a practitioner’s point of view, two things are clear to me. 

First, the consumer class action is far from dead.  As Fisher’s article points out, there are many cases that won’t implicate arbitration clauses in consumer contracts at all, such as those involving retail products.  Moreover, even setting aside the prospect of executive branch or Congressional action in effectively overruling Concepcion, there are a variety of legal arguments that are sure to be raised for invalidating or avoiding enforcement of class arbitration waivers in the lower courts, notwithstanding the Supreme Court’s decision.  There are countless theories, many of which have yet to be dreamed up by enterprising plaintiffs’ lawyers, for why a consumer class action in a particular case should be allowed to go forward in court notwithstanding an arbitration provision.

Second, the fact that future legislative or executive action or lower court judicial gloss may water down or limit Concepcion‘s ultimate impact should not keep companies from taking advantage of what is now, at minimum, an enhanced tool for protection against the significant cost of defending against class action litigation.  In the short term, any in-house or outside counsel charged with advising corporate clients should be considering ways to incorporate class arbitration waivers or similar provisions into the client’s form contracts and terms of use.  While it may not be failsafe protection from class actions, a well-drafted, reasonably limited class arbitration waiver, has an exponentially greater chance of being enforced than it did before the Concepcion decision was announced.

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Two op-eds published today highlight the philosophical debate over the impact of the Supreme Court’s recent decision in AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion.

The first, published by the New York Times, argues that the decision is a “devastating blow to consumer rights” because it makes it practically impossible for many consumers to seek vindication of their rights in any forum.

In response, Forbes contributor Daniel Fischer argues that Concepcion’s limitation on consumer class actions does not really harm consumers because consumer class actions really only benefit lawyers.  As a prime example, he points to the controversial proposed settlement in a class action involving DirectBuy to which 36 attorneys general and a consumer rights organization have objected.

I would recommend reading both articles for anyone interested in the possible social and legal implications of the Court’s recent decision.

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As 2010 winds down, it’s time to review the key developments in class action law.  It was an especially busy year for the federal courts, and in particular the U.S. Supreme Court, on issues impacting class action practice.  Here, in chronological order, are 10 key developments from the year that was:

  1. January 5 – In In re Baycol Products Litigation, the Eighth Circuit follows the Seventh Circuit’s lead in upholding the right of a federal court to enjoin a putative statewide class action from proceeding where a federal court had already denied class certification in a case involving substantially similar claims.  (See CAB entries dated January 7 and January 12).
  2. February 23 – In a decision that will impact many class actions removed under the Class Action Fairness Act, the Supreme Court adopts the “nerve center test” as the standard for determining corporate citizenship, in Hertz Corp. v. Friend.  (See CAB entry dated March 2)
  3. March 31 – The Supreme Court holds that states may not regulate the types of claims that may be filed as class actions in the federal courts, in Shady Grove Orthopedic Associates, P.A. v. Allstate Insurance Co.  (See CAB entry dated April 8)
  4. April 7 – In American Honda Motor Co. v. Allen, the Seventh Circuit holds that a trial court must rule on challenges to the admissibility of expert testimony relevant to class certification before deciding whether a class may be certified.  (See CAB entry dated May 4)
  5. April 26 – The Ninth Circuit issues its decision in Dukes v. Wal-mart Stores, Inc., adopting rigorous class certification standards similar to those previously adopted by the Second Circuit in In re IPO Securities Litigation, 471 F.3d 24 (2d Cir. 2006), but nonetheless certifying under FRCP 23(b)(2), what has been called the largest employment discrimination class action in history.
  6. April 27 – The Supreme Court seemingly puts an end, for all practical purposes, to the concept of class arbitration by holding that a defendant could not be compelled to defend an arbitration on a class basis where the arbitration clause did not expressly provide for class arbitration, in Stolt-Nielsen S.A. v. Animalfeeds Int’l Corp.  (See CAB entry dated May 11).
  7. June 24 – In Morrison v. National Australia Bank, the Supreme Court deals a fatal blow to “foreign-cubed” class actions, holding that § 10(b) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 does not allow for fraud claims involving transactions on foreign exchanges that occurred outside the United States. (See case summary at SCOTUS blog).
  8. July 19, October 20 – An Eleventh Circuit panel issues a controversial decision in Cappuccitti v. DirecTV, Inc., severely restricting CAFA removal jurisdiction to cases where the amount in controversy exceeds $75,000 with respect to at least one class member, but later reverses itself in an October 15 opinion.  (See Guest Post from Eric Jon Taylor and Jon Chally at CAFA Law Blog for more on the first decision and this October 20 CAB entry on the second decision).
  9. November 9 – Supreme Court hears oral argument in AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, in which the Court considers whether the Federal Arbitration Act preempts state law holding a class arbitration waiver unconscionable.  (See CAB fsummary of oral argument dated November 17).
  10. December 6 – Supreme Court grants certiorari in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, to decide the issue of whether a claim for monetary relief can be certified under FRCP 23(b)(2).  (See CAB entry dated December 7).

Just considering the cases still awaiting ruling before the Supreme Court, 2011 promises to be another exciting year in the world of class actions.  Happy New Year to all!

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University of Missouri Law Professor S.I. Strong, guru of international class arbitration, has two new intriguing publications coming out soon.  In both works, she discuss the academic debate about the appropriate international arbitration rules for dealing with large groups of similar claims and discuss the ways in which multi-party or representative procedures are likely to evolve outside the United States.  Strong examines the common conception of “class action arbitration” as a “uniquely American device” and posits that a system of multi-party arbitration, better characterized as “collective” arbitration than “class” arbitration, may be more likely to emerge as the predominant procedural device in international disputes subject to arbitration.

Drafts of both articles are available for download at SSRN via the links below.

From Class to Collective: The De-Americanization of Class Arbitration, 26 ARBITRATION INTERNATIONAL 493 (2010)

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1656511

Class Arbitration Outside the United States: Reading the Tea Leaves, DOSSIER VII – MULTIPARTY ARBITRATION (ICC Institute of World Business Law, 2010).

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1517272

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The Supreme Court recently issued a decision addressing the issue of class arbitration.  In Stolt-Nielson S.A. v.  Animalfeeds International Corp., No. 08-1198 (April 27, 2010), an antitrust class action involving allegations of illegal price-fixing by international shipping companies, the Court held that an arbitration panel’s decision to force class arbitration was invalid because the arbitration agreement was silent about whether arbitration could proceed on a class basis.   

Beyond its impact in cases involving class arbitration and the interpretation of arbitration clauses in domestic disputes, the decision partially closes the door on arbitration as a possible global forum for litigating class actions.  The Second Circuit Court of Appeals had upheld the arbitration panel’s decision to compel class arbitration and certify a class of all purchasers worldwide of the defendants’ shipping services.  The Supreme Court’s decision leaves open the possibility of global class arbitration based on an arbitration agreement that expressly permits class arbitration, but class arbitration cannot be compelled simply because the agreement is silent on the issue.

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