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Posts Tagged ‘class certification standard’

Matt Masich of Law Week Colorado has a good article out today previewing oral arguments scheduled for tomorrow in four class-action related cases.  The outcome of these cases could have a dramatic effect on class action practice in the state. 

The issues to be considered include the proper standard for reviewing class certification, the burden of proof on class certificeation, the level of scrutiny to be given to expert testimony at the class certification stage, the extent to which a plaintiff must prove that all class members suffered injury to justify class treatment, and whether reliance and causation can be presumed in putative class actions seeking damages for fraud.

Here is the schedule of the oral arguments to be held tomorrow, March 1, 2011, in the four cases, along with the issues presented in each case:

9:00 a.m., State Farm v. Reyher, No. 10SC77 (see the Court of Appeals’ Opinion)

Whether the court of appeals erred in reversing the trial court’s denial of class certification under C.R.C.P. 23.

10:00 a.m., Garcia v. Medved Chevrolet, No. 09SC1080 (see the Court of Appeals’ opinion)

Whether the court of appeals erred in reversing the trial court’s certification of a class.

1:30 p.m., BP America v. Patterson, No. 10SC214 (See the Court of Appeals’ opinion)

Whether the court of appeals erred in affirming the trial court’s certification of a class.

2:30 p.m., Jackson v. Unocal Corp., No. 09SC668 (See the Court of Appeals’ opinion)

1) Whether the court of appeals erred by creating a “preponderance of the evidence” burden of proof in the certification of a class pursuant to C.R.C.P. 23.

2) Whether the court of appeals erred by requiring the trial court to assess the credibility of expert testimony at the class certification stage.

3) Whether the court of appeals’ construction of C.R.C.P. 23 improperly invaded the trial court’s case management discretion.

The oral argument in each case is scheduled for one hour.

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I’m embarrassingly late in reporting on them, but I would be remiss if I did not mention two key recent United States Circuit Courts of Appeals decisions addressing the legal standards governing class certification under FRCP 23:

In American Honda Motor Co. v. Allen, No. 09-8051 (7th Cir., April 7, 2010) the Seventh Circuit held that a district court abused its discretion by failing to conduct a Daubert inquiry into the admissibility of expert testimony before relying on that testimony in determining that the plaintiff had met his burden of establishing the elements of class certification. 

Meanwhile, in Dukes v. Wal-Mart Stores, Nos. 04-16688 and 04-16720 (9th Cir., April 26, 2010) (en banc), the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals clarified that circuit’s standards for conducting the “rigorous analysis” necessary to determine whether the elements of Rule 23 are satisfied.  Following extensive discussion of the history of class certification standards both outside and within the Ninth Circuit, the court articulated class certification standards that essentially mirror those recognized in the Second Circuit’s decision in In re IPO Securities Litigation, 471 F.3d 24 (2d Cir. 2006).  However, applying those standards, the court came to a very different result, affirming certification of a nationwide class of thousands of female employees seeking injunctive and declaratory relief, back pay, and punitive damages arising out of allegedly common, discriminatory employment practices.

Both decisions are worthy of careful reading and study, and you will no doubt hear more about both decisions in the weeks and months ahead.

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