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Posts Tagged ‘disparate impact’

According to Pete Kasperowicz at The Hill’s Floor Action Blog, Senator Al Franken (D-Minn.) and Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.) have introduced legislation in Congress intended to reverse limitations on employment discrimination class actions recognized in the Supreme Court’s 2011 decision in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes

A fact sheet available on Senator Franken’s official website describes the key provisions of the bill as follows:

The Equal Employment Opportunity Restoration Act will restore workers’ ability to challenge discriminatory employment practices on a class-wide basis. It adds to Title 28 of the U.S. Code a new section 4201, which does the following:

  • Section 4201(a) creates a new judicial procedure – called “group actions” – that workers can use when bringing employment discrimination cases. The requirements for establishing a group action are the same as the pre-Dukes requirements for maintaining a class action under Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure—namely, clarifying that the merits of the case need not be proven to certify the group action.
  • Section 4201(b) provides that group actions can be used regardless of whether the group is challenging an objective employment practice, a subjective employment practice, or a mixed employment practice (such as the use of a written test to qualify for an interview).  It also provides that employers’ written anti-discrimination policies can be considered as a defense to certification only insofar as the employer demonstrates that the policy actually has been implemented in practice.
  • Section 4201(c) says that the group actions authorized by this section are subject to the same procedural requirements as class actions authorized by Rule 23. These include notice and opt-out requirements. This section also preserves the application of the Class Action Fairness Act and the availability of appeals.
  • Section 4201(d) says that courts can use statistical analyses and any other procedures they deem necessary to provide justice to prevailing plaintiffs.

It does not appear from Senator Franken’s fact sheet that the bill has significant bipartisan support, and having just been introduced, there is no telling how far it will go towards becoming law in its present form.  However, we’ll keep an eye on any future developments here at CAB.

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For those readers who are interested in additional insights on Judge Posner’s opinion in McReynolds v. Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Inc., No. 11-3639 (7th Cir., Feb. 24, 2012), which was the subject of Wednesday’s CAB post, here’s a link to an insightful executive alert on the decision, which was authored by colleagues in Baker Hostler’s New York office, partner Deborah Renner and associate Matthew Moody.

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Last Friday, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals issued a significant employment class action decision that may challenge conventional wisdom about the impact of the Supreme Court’s 2011 decision in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes.   The opinion, authored by respected Judge Richard Posner, is McReynolds v. Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Inc., No. 11-3639 (7th Cir., Feb. 24, 2012).

The procedural history of McReynolds is interesting, because the plaintiffs had actually moved for reconsideration of an earlier denial of class certification after the decidedly pro-employer decision in Dukes was announced.  Although the trial court judge was unconvinced to change his earlier decision, he did agree that Dukes presented a good basis for reconsideration of the class action issue, and expressly stated in his decision that he believed the case was a good candidate for an interlocutory appeal under Rule 23(f).

The Seventh Circuit accepted the appeal, and reversed the denial of class certification.  The Seventh Circuit panel recognized that individualized issues would prevent certification of any claims for back pay or damages, but held that certification of the issue of whether the defendant’s challenged employment policies had an adverse impact on members of a protected class would still be appropriate under Rule 23(b)(2), which allows a class to be certified for the purpose of awarding injunctive relief, and Rule 23(c)(4), which allows certification of particular issues.  Essentially, the case would be certified for the purpose of deciding whether the defendant’s challenged policies created a disparate impact to members of a protected class and for the purpose of ruling on plaintiffs’ request to enjoin the practices.  Any claims for back pay, compensatory or punitive damages would then have to be brought as separate proceedings. 

In reaching its conclusion, the court drew a key factual distinction between the practices being challenged in the case before it and the practices that had been challenged in Dukes.  In McReynolds, the practice being challenged was the company-wide policy of “permitting brokers to form their own teams and prescribing criteria for account distributions that favor the already successfulthose who may owe heir success to having been invited to join a successful or promising team.”  The court distinguished this policy, which it characterized as a firm-wide policy of Merrill Lynch, from the allegations in Dukes, which were that the lack of a uniform corporate policy on discrimination created too much discretion in local managers to create locally discriminatory policies.

I’ll be posting more on this decision within the coming week, so stay tuned…

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Along with leading Colorado Employment attorney Todd J. McNamara, I’ll be presenting at a breakfast seminar at the CBA-CLE next Tuesday with the (hopefully) self-explanatory title: Wal-Mart v. Dukes: Reshaping Class Certification.   The particulars follow below.  Hope to see you there!

When:

July 12, 2011 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Where:

CLECI Large Classroom
1900 Grant Street, Suite 300
Denver CO 80203
(303) 860-0608

Credits:

General credits: 1.00

Prices

CBA Member $59.00
CBA Labor & Employment Section Member $29.00
CBA Litigation Section Member $29.00
Non Member $69.00
 
July 2011
 
Wal-Mart v. Dukes: Reshaping Class CertificationLIVE IN DENVER
 
 
Program Description:
 
When it issued its decision in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, the Supreme Court did much more than simply end one of the largest class action suits in American history. It also set a host of new ground rules for federal courts to evaluate class certification, both in employment discrimination cases and in other types of class actions. This program will discuss the significant potential impacts of this landmark decision on a host of issues, including 1) evaluation of merits issues at the class certification stage; 2) the potentially broadened scope of the commonality element of FRCP 23(a); 3) the standards for evaluating expert testimony at the class certification stage; 4) the threshold standard needed to establish “common proof” of an employment or other business practice; 5) the use of statistical evidence in support of class certification; and 6) the standards for adjudicating claims for monetary relief under FRCP 23(b)(2). The program will examine what the Court had to say about these and other topics, and it will also explore the questions that remain unanswered following the decision.
 
Presented by Paul G. Karlsgodt, Esq. and Todd J. McNamara, Esq.
 
Agenda:
8:00 am – 8:30 am Registration
8:30 am – 9:30 am Program (Continental Breakfast Provided)
 
 
Faculty:
 
Paul G. Karlsgodt, Esq.
Baker Hostetler
 
Paul Karlsgodt is a litigation partner whose practice emphasizes class action defense and other complex commercial litigation. Mr. Karlsgodt has represented insurance companies and other FORTUNE 500 companies in numerous nationwide and statewide consumer class action lawsuits and related litigation. He has represented clients in class action lawsuits involving sales and marketing practices, insurance coverage, claims adjustment practices, corporate securities, retailer/dealer disputes, employment and taxation.
 
Mr. Karlsgodt is editor and primary contributor to the legal blog, http://www.ClassActionBlawg.com, which covers a variety of class action-related issues, including decisions, trends, best practices, news and reform, both in the U.S. and throughout the world. He also founded and served as the first Chair of the Class Actions, Derivative Suits and Mass Torts Subsection of the Litigation Section of the Colorado Bar Association. He remains an active member of the Subsection.
 
 
Todd J. McNamara, Esq.
McNamara Roseman & Kazmierski LLP
 
 
Todd McNamara opened his own firm in 1995 and limits his practice exclusively to employment law matters. Mr. McNamara was lead private class counsel in Wilkerson, et al., v. Martin-Marietta, the largest age discrimination claim brought within the State of Colorado, which settled for a reported $7.6 million. Mr. McNamara secured the first race discrimination verdict in the United States against a real estate franchise for failure to award a sales agency to an African-American in Tyler v. ReMax. Most recently, Mr. McNamara, together with class cocounsel, settled a $3.85 million disability discrimination case against the United States Postal Services.
 
Todd has previously served as co-chair of the Colorado Bar Association Labor Law Committee, and is a member of the National Employment Lawyers Association. He serves as an arbitrator and mediator for the American Arbitration Association Employment Panel. He is co-editor of FederalEmployment Jury Instructions and has just recently completed a seventh supplement to that publication, which is used throughout the United States by both lawyers and judges. He is a co-chapter editor with the Practitioners Guide to Colorado Employment Law and has published a number of other articles on employment law issues in both Trial Talk and The Colorado Lawyer. Todd is a Fellow of The College of Labor and Employment Lawyers, one of approximately only 20 in Colorado.

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