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Posts Tagged ‘employment class action’

It’s not too late to sign up for tomorrow’s Strafford Publications Webinar Class Certification After Dukes, Bayer and Halliburton Rulings.   As a preview, here is a copy of the written materials for my portion of the presentation, Opposing Class Certification After Dukes, Bayer and Halliburton.  I hope you can make it.

 

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Along with leading Colorado Employment attorney Todd J. McNamara, I’ll be presenting at a breakfast seminar at the CBA-CLE next Tuesday with the (hopefully) self-explanatory title: Wal-Mart v. Dukes: Reshaping Class Certification.   The particulars follow below.  Hope to see you there!

When:

July 12, 2011 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Where:

CLECI Large Classroom
1900 Grant Street, Suite 300
Denver CO 80203
(303) 860-0608

Credits:

General credits: 1.00

Prices

CBA Member $59.00
CBA Labor & Employment Section Member $29.00
CBA Litigation Section Member $29.00
Non Member $69.00
 
July 2011
 
Wal-Mart v. Dukes: Reshaping Class CertificationLIVE IN DENVER
 
 
Program Description:
 
When it issued its decision in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, the Supreme Court did much more than simply end one of the largest class action suits in American history. It also set a host of new ground rules for federal courts to evaluate class certification, both in employment discrimination cases and in other types of class actions. This program will discuss the significant potential impacts of this landmark decision on a host of issues, including 1) evaluation of merits issues at the class certification stage; 2) the potentially broadened scope of the commonality element of FRCP 23(a); 3) the standards for evaluating expert testimony at the class certification stage; 4) the threshold standard needed to establish “common proof” of an employment or other business practice; 5) the use of statistical evidence in support of class certification; and 6) the standards for adjudicating claims for monetary relief under FRCP 23(b)(2). The program will examine what the Court had to say about these and other topics, and it will also explore the questions that remain unanswered following the decision.
 
Presented by Paul G. Karlsgodt, Esq. and Todd J. McNamara, Esq.
 
Agenda:
8:00 am – 8:30 am Registration
8:30 am – 9:30 am Program (Continental Breakfast Provided)
 
 
Faculty:
 
Paul G. Karlsgodt, Esq.
Baker Hostetler
 
Paul Karlsgodt is a litigation partner whose practice emphasizes class action defense and other complex commercial litigation. Mr. Karlsgodt has represented insurance companies and other FORTUNE 500 companies in numerous nationwide and statewide consumer class action lawsuits and related litigation. He has represented clients in class action lawsuits involving sales and marketing practices, insurance coverage, claims adjustment practices, corporate securities, retailer/dealer disputes, employment and taxation.
 
Mr. Karlsgodt is editor and primary contributor to the legal blog, http://www.ClassActionBlawg.com, which covers a variety of class action-related issues, including decisions, trends, best practices, news and reform, both in the U.S. and throughout the world. He also founded and served as the first Chair of the Class Actions, Derivative Suits and Mass Torts Subsection of the Litigation Section of the Colorado Bar Association. He remains an active member of the Subsection.
 
 
Todd J. McNamara, Esq.
McNamara Roseman & Kazmierski LLP
 
 
Todd McNamara opened his own firm in 1995 and limits his practice exclusively to employment law matters. Mr. McNamara was lead private class counsel in Wilkerson, et al., v. Martin-Marietta, the largest age discrimination claim brought within the State of Colorado, which settled for a reported $7.6 million. Mr. McNamara secured the first race discrimination verdict in the United States against a real estate franchise for failure to award a sales agency to an African-American in Tyler v. ReMax. Most recently, Mr. McNamara, together with class cocounsel, settled a $3.85 million disability discrimination case against the United States Postal Services.
 
Todd has previously served as co-chair of the Colorado Bar Association Labor Law Committee, and is a member of the National Employment Lawyers Association. He serves as an arbitrator and mediator for the American Arbitration Association Employment Panel. He is co-editor of FederalEmployment Jury Instructions and has just recently completed a seventh supplement to that publication, which is used throughout the United States by both lawyers and judges. He is a co-chapter editor with the Practitioners Guide to Colorado Employment Law and has published a number of other articles on employment law issues in both Trial Talk and The Colorado Lawyer. Todd is a Fellow of The College of Labor and Employment Lawyers, one of approximately only 20 in Colorado.

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Many commentators correctly that the decision in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes would be favorable to business interests.  However, unlike the Court’s earlier decision in AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, the decision does not necessarily threaten to sound a death knell for class actions or even a particular category of class actions.  Instead, the decision merely clarifies the standards on which future class actions are to be evaluated in the federal courts, but it does so in a way that is likely to impact class actions in many areas of the law outside of the employment law context.  Here are some of the key issues on which the opinion will undoubtedly be cited in the future, and some thoughts on the potential impact of the decision on each issue.

1) Standard of review  – The majority’s decision clarifies a long-standing misconception about the ability of a federal court to consider questions relating to the merits of a case in the class certification phase.  For more than 30 years, plaintiffs’ counsel and many courts have cited the Court’s opinion in Eisen v. Carlisle & Jacquelin, 417 U.S. 156 (1974) as prohibiting any examination of the plaintiffs’ claims on the merits at the class certification phase.  Consistent with the majority trend in the lower federal courts, the Supreme Court’s decision in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. confirms that a court should consider and resolve any issues of fact that are necessary to determine whether one or more elements of Rule 23 are satisfied, regardless of whether those issues may overlap or be identical to one or more issues to be decided in ruling on the merits of the plaintiff’s claims.

2) Evaluation of Expert Testimony – The majority decision makes clear that it is appropriate for a federal court to conduct a Daubert analysis to consider the reliability and helpfulness of expert witness opinions at the class certification phase.  It is no longer sufficient for a plaintiff to present expert testimony and then argue that the Court may find that testimony reliable at some later point in the proceedings.  Again, in keeping with te trend among the federal circuit courts, the Court’s analysis in Wal-mart Stores, Inc. makes clear that the reliability and relevance of expert testimony proposed as “common proof” should be evaluated before granting class certification.

3) Use of Statistical Evidence in Support of Class Certification – The majority’s decision leaves open the possibility that statistical evidence might be used in establishing the existence of common proof in certain cases, but it sets a high standard for when proffered statistical evidence can be considered as adequate proof of the existence of “common issue.”  Significantly, Part III of Justice Scalia’s opinion, which was joined by all 9 justices, disapproves of the “Trial by Formula” approach to class actions, in which a sample of claims is tried on the merits, and the results of that sample are then applied proportionally to the claims of the entire class.

4) Certification of Claims Seeking Monetary Relief Under FRCP 23(b)(2) – This is perhaps the most uncontroversial aspect of the opinion in that part of the unanimous holding of the Court.  The Court’s holding is also straightforward, at least conceptually: claims for monetary relief may not be certified under FRCP 23(b)(2) unless they are merely incidental to injunctive or declaratory relief being requested on behalf of the class as a whole.  However, the devil may be in the details, as future courts (especially outside the employment law context) will be left with the task of defining what monetary relief is “incidental” to injunctive or declaratory relief and what is not.

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The United States Supreme Court will hold oral argument next Tuesday, March 29, 2011, in case of Wal-mart v. Dukes, No. 10-277.  The issue for review, at least so far, according to order granting certiorari, is:

Whether claims for monetary relief can be certified under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23(b)(2) – which by its terms is limited to injunctive or corresponding declaratory relief – and, if so, under what circumstances.

Hopefully, questions posed by the justices during the argument will also provide insight into what the Court meant in its somewhat vague directive that the parties brief the issue “Whether the Class Certification ordered under Rule 23(b)(2) was consistent with Rule 23(a).”

Another thing I’ll be looking out for is whether the questions appear to limit the analysis to the employment discrimination context, or whether they portend a more general analysis of Rule 23 that could impact class actions in other subject matter areas.

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I’m late for my Inns of Court dinner, so time does not permit me to elaborate in detail, but I wanted to point out two recent class action-related reports of note.  Be sure to check them out.

1) Seyfarth Shaw’s Seventh Annual Workplace Class Action Litigation Report.

2) Cornerstone Research, Securities Class Action Filings, 2010 Year in Review.

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Can plaintiffs seek back-damages using a class action vehicle that’s built for righting wrongs in equity through remedies like injunction?  In the biggest work place class action ever, the United States Supreme Court has granted cert on the question of whether plaintiffs can use the Rule 23(b)(2) injunctive class procedure as a vehicle to seek money damages.  Why does it matter?  Because injunctive classes are much easier to certify than damages classes.  Usually, when plaintiffs seek damages as their primary remedy they pursue class certification through Rule 23(b)(3), the money damages class, which has significantly more burdensome procedural requirements to achieve class certification than its injunctive counterpart.  The high court should have an answer by June of 2011.

For an accessible preview check out Lyle Denniston’s article at Scotus Blog.  Read the 9th Circuit opinion here.  Check out other comments by Supreme Court watchers:  David G. Savage has an article in the L.A. Times; Jess Bravin and Ann Zimmerman have this piece in the Wall Street Journal; Adam Liptak and Steven Greenhouse file this report in the New York Times.

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I’m excited to announce that the Colorado Bar Association Class Actions subsection is teaming up with the Labor & Employment Law Section to bring you CLE luncheon entitled: A Primer on Employment “Class Action” Litigation: Class Actions, Collective Actions, and EEOC Enforcement.  If you are interested in attending, please send me an email at pkarlsgodt@bakerlaw.com.
 
Date and Time: November 22, 2010 at 12:00 noon
Location: Holland & Hart LLP, 555 17th St, Ste 3200, Denver, CO 80202 
 
Summary:
 
Employment and labor law is one of the hottest areas of class action litigation these days.  But the term “employment class action” is often used to describe cases involving a variety of procedures, of which the Rule 23 is only one.  This program will explore the different mechanisms that may used to resolve mass employment litigation and the differences and interplay between class actions, collective actions, and EEOC enforcement actions.
 
Faculty:
 
Steven Moore is the Managing Shareholder of the Denver office of Ogletree Deakins, one of the nation’s leading labor and employment law firms.  Mr. Moore will discuss the interplay between Rule 23 class actions in employment cases and other collective action procedures, such as the opt-in procedure applicable to cases under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).
 
Stephanie Struble is a Trial Attorney with the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) in Denver.  Ms. Struble will discuss the role of the EEOC and private litigants in cases involving an alleged pattern or practice of employment discrimination.

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