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Posts Tagged ‘notice program’

Renowned notice expert and friend of ClassActionBlawg.com, Shannon Wheatman of Kinsella Media, recently published an article with some insightful tips on ensuring successful notice in class action settlements.  In the article, titled Cutting Through the Clutter: Eight Tips for Capturing Class Members’ Attention and Increasing Response, Dr. Wheatman shares eight specific ideas for ensuring meaningful notice in an age of ever-increasing media fragmentation.  For more information and to download a copy, click the title of the article above.

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My partner, Casie Collignon, recently attended CLE International’s conference Class Actions: Plaintiff and Defense Perspectives in Chicago earlier this month, and she graciously agreed to share a summary of her notes.  Here they are for anyone who was unable to attend.  I’ll be attending the ABA’s 16th National Institute on Class Actions next week, so stay tuned for my notes from that conference as well.

On October 4th and 5th, esteemed panels of class action plaintiff and defense lawyers, along with multiple reputable class action administrators, gathered for panel discussions involving class action trends across the country from all perspectives. Below are just a few of the highlights from the conference:

  • Class Actions are not dead after DukesDukes may not have had the one-sided effect that everyone anticipated. Program Co-Director Francis Citera of Greenberg Traurig noted that class certification decisions after Dukes have been, despite popular opinion, very balanced.  In the federal courts since Dukes, there have been 32 cases certified, 33 denials of class certification, and 15 cases where certification was denied in part and granted in part.
  • Manageability remains key to certification – Even though the Dukes, Concepcion, and Comcast trends are on the tips of all class action practitioners’ tongues, manageability is still a top concern from all perspectives.  The Honorable William J.  Bauer of the Seventh Circuit opined about the importance of being able to be able to show the Court what a class action trial will actually look like.  This sentiment was echoed by plaintiff’s class action lawyer Kenneth Wexler of Wexler Wallace, who suggested that all plaintiffs’ class certification motions should be accompanied by an actual trial plan.  Defense attorney Sascha Henry of Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton opined  that the defense practitioner can take advantage of both the existence of a plaintiff’s trial plan or the lack of a trial plan in the manageability context.  For example, if there is no trial plan at all, the defendant can argue that the plaintiffs   have not alleged a practical way to manage the case and therefore have not met their burden of proving the manageability requirement.  Alternatively, if a plan is submitted, then the defendant has a precise manageability roadmap to attack. 
  • New settlement notice program trends – While traditional mailers and post card notices still reign supreme for claim rates, Patrick Izie of Class Action Services discussed some new media trends in class action settlements.  He opined that new media, such as QR codes, mobile device notifications, and coupon websites can have a dramatic impact on your claims rates without increased costs. And, even though the parties may not have intended their class settlements to appear on websites such as duckydeals.com, once these types of sites start listing your class action settlements, you can expect claims rates to spike.
  • Class Certification may never truly be over –   Attorney for the plaintiff in McReynolds v. Merrill Lynch, Linda Friedman of Stowell & Friedman, and class action defense lawyer Andrew Trask of McGuireWoods, both agreed that an important lesson to be learned from both the Merrill Lynch case and the recent denial of the motion to dismiss in the smaller Walmart case which is back pending in the Northern District of California, is that no ruling in the class certification context is ever truly permanent. Thus, the class action community should be on the lookout for second and even third bites at the apple with smaller proposed classes and arguments for issue class certification.

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My apologies for the late notice (I’ve been on vacation), but I’ll be speaking at a Webinar on class action notice requirements tomorrow, and it’s not too late to sign up.  The panel also includes Winston & Strawn Partner Matthew Walsh and notice expert (and occasional contributor to this blog) Shannon Wheatman.  Here’s a brief description of the program: 

Attorneys’ options for delivering notice of class actions and settlements to members have increased, even as they must adhere to more stringent standards to ensure due process. Courts are more receptive to notice in forms like email, websites, postcards and ordinary course mailings.

Even as delivery methods evolve, the words themselves remain a vital consideration for attorneys. Recent F.R.C.P. Rule 23 revisions require notices be drafted in plain and simple language. Attorneys are often not meeting the plain language standard, which can potentially jeopardize judicial review.

Defendants are obliged to comply with increased notice requirements under the Class Action Fairness Act. Failure to provide notice of a class action settlement to federal and state regulators can also lead to opt-outs by class members.

Listen as our panel of experienced litigators examines the vital notice requirements affecting due process in class actions. The panel will review email and other nontraditional means of delivering notice to members, explain avoidable mistakes that compromise meeting the plain language requirement, and discuss defendants’ need to provide proper notice of settlements.

For more information and to register for the program, visit the program page on Strafford’s website.

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The Record staff writer Harvy Lipman authored this article today discussing the New Jersey Attorney General’s warning to consumers about a scam involving a fake class action notice.  The official-looking notice directs recipients to send personal information in order to obtain settlement benefits in a fictitious securities case brought by a fictitious government official.

I have to wonder whether the emergence of fake class action notice scams will provide fodder for class action settlement objectors who argue about the effectiveness of a real class action settlement notice program.  This is all the more reason to do something that I preach about regularly on CAB: always consider retaining a qualified notice expert as part of a class action settlement.

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